On The Right Lead August 2020


It’s a strange summer, with no horse shows, rodeos or big trail rides. So what are we all doing with our horses? Luckily we can still ride, groom and spend quality time with our ponies on an individual basis, or in small groups. 

This is a good time be sure you are prepared should the worst happen during an emergency such as a wildfire. August through early November is peak fire season here in northern California and while we have been lucky so far, things could change. One consideration, should we have more preemptive power shut-offs, is providing water for our stock. For many rural property owners who are dependent on an electric pump for well water, the PSPS (Public Safety Power Shut-off) means not only that there are no lights and refrigerators, but possibly also no water. The average horse needs about 10 gallons of water a day, more if they are working or the weather is extremely hot. A horse deprived of feed, but supplied drinking water, is capable of surviving 20 to 25 days. A horse deprived of water may only live up to 3 to 6 days.

Options for providing water for our horses and livestock during a power shut off include storing a supply in a tank or pond, using a generator to run the well pump and hauling water from an available source. If the humans have to evacuate and the stock stays behind, then having available water that doesn’t require manpower (such as running the generator daily to fill the tanks) becomes even more crucial. While small automatic waterers such as in stalls or corrals are convenient most of the time, they will not fit the bill if the water is off for days. Large stock tanks can be a life-saver; the horses can drink, water can be dipped out in buckets for stall horses, and it can even be used to fight fire. Keep in mind that 10 gallon per horse per day requirement – do you have enough available water for your horses and stock?


This is also a great time to brush up on trailer loading skills. Loading a horse during an emergency is stressful enough and even the most well-trained horse might be too frightened to load up when a crackling wall of flames is heading his way. When The Horse magazine took a poll of readers about whether their horse would load in a strange trailer in an emergency, 78% of the respondents said, yes, their horse would load. But, in past fires there were plenty of horses that needed a lot of extra coaxing to load up. Many horses get used to one trailer configuration, such as a ramp or step-up. Will he load in a two-horse trailer? What about with strange horses, or handlers? Will your horse unload when asked?

The Horse and the University of California, Davis, Center for Equine Health have partnered to help protect you and your horse from natural disaster. Test your preparedness and learn potentially life-saving tricks with this interactive guide.

Make sure your trailer is safe and ready to go – check out this Trailer Checklist to be sure you and your horse are ready for the worst!


Available now at Rainbow!

ECHO Bear Cat’s FP2126, fire cart features a Honda GX200 engine. The cart is designed with oversized 5-spoke wheels to allow easy movement across uneven terrain. The durable tube steel frame provides the pump and engine with maximum protection and safe operation.

Features: 
196cc HONDA GX200 ENGINE
RECOIL START & LOW OIL ALERT
FUEL TANK CAPACITY 0.82 GAL. (3.1L)
2″ INTAKE CONNECTION MNPT
2″ OUTLET CONNECTION MNPT
126 GPM MAX FLOW
85 MAX. PSI
CENTRIFUGAL PUMP
ALUMINUM IMPELLER AND HOUSING
CAST IRON VOLUTE
197′ TOTAL LIFT
26′ SUCTION LIFT

Items Included: 
50′ x 1.5″ FIRE HOSE WITH FITTINGS
12′ X 2″ SUCTION HOSE WITH FOOT VALVE
PRIMING JUG
FIRE NOZZLE

Give one of Rainbow’s Outdoor Power Equipment specialist a call at the Ukiah, Lakeport or Middletown stores, to learn more about the Bear Cat Fire Cart!


Trivia! All correct answers are entered into a random drawing for a $15 Rainbow Gift Card.

July Trivia winner was Angela Ortega with the correct answer that a stock tank can not be used as a flying saucer (at least without modifications …). 

This month’ question is, A horse deprived of feed, but supplied drinking water, is capable of surviving how many days? ENTER HERE!

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